Collective Queerschlag

We’re a free collective of queer people in Basel aiming to question local and global politics and culture from a queer viewpoint, and to engage in their transformation. We recognize the importance to include other forms of oppression and discrimination like racism, sexism, classism, ableism  and capitalist exploitation into our queer thought, because they often overlap and stabilize each other. Not to be blind for the effect of these power-relations and privileges inside the queer movement itself is central to our collective. 

The Collective Queerschlag came into existence following a gathering of the habs queer basel, the queerstudents Baseland many queer individuals, in order to organize the program around the “Remember-Stonewall-March”2019 in Basel. To commemorate the Stonewall Riots, teams have found together to write queer texts, organize a party and speeches, cinema events and more. The formation of the collective is an open process, open to new perspectives and critical approaches with the goal to live creativity and diversity as much as possible. Queerschlag wants to persist beyond the Stonewall-Event and intervene into the current social order – politically, culturally and socially. You want to participate? Write us and come to one of our meetings: info@queerschlag.com

 

Queer – what do we mean?

Queer breaks with the norm of heterosexuality, with binary genderrules and gendered stereotypes. Queer challenges the norm of monogamous/monoamorous relationships and the compulsory norm to have sexual and/or romantic relationships altogether. Queer criticizes the existing power- and production-relations. Queer questions the popular beauty standards, prejudices about class, ethnicity and (dis)ability. Queer opens up a space, where freedom is more than a liberal lipservice, because people are empowered to live their lives, sexual- and gender-identities with more self-determination – without again being caged and predefined by migration foreground, skin-color, class-belonging etc. The Stonewall Riots were loud, courageous, rebellious, critical – and that’s how we understand queer as well.